fedward, tumbling

goes on, and the heat goes on
~ Monday, August 4, 2014 ~
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I’ve speculated that people have a certain reservoir of affection that they need to express, and in the absence of any more appropriate object — a child or a lover, a parent or a friend — they will lavish that same devotion on a pug or a Manx or a cockatiel, even on something neurologically incapable of reciprocating that emotion, like a monitor lizard or a day trader or an aloe plant.
Tags: cats
~ Friday, August 1, 2014 ~
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Analysing the most popular web sites Unlike the mostly standards-based ‘desktop’ web, many modern mobile web pages were designed and built for iOS and the iPhone. This results in users of other devices often receiving a degraded experience. A few weeks ago we talked about our vision and priorities for the web. We believe that “The Web should just work for everyone – users, developers and businesses.” We started researching what it would take to make the mobile web “just work” for our customers.

The Mobile Web should just work for everyone - IEBlog - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

Quoth tiffanyb:

There’s something delicious about the Internet Explorer team’s hot, salty tears when most internet things are developed for someone else’s browser instead of “for everyone.”

I think the particular detail there is they know what it’s like to lose your lead to the cause of standards compliance. Microsoft is often at cross-purposes with itself. The developer outreach people realized long ago that rising tides raise all boats, and the Visual Studio development environment is the best IDE I’ve used (code completion, syntax highlighting, method signatures, yadda yada). The only problem with it is in the end you’re stuck running a server OS that is ill suited for shoving in a lights-out data center.  But I digress.

From the developer perspective, they’ve been on this ball for a while, even if the corporate vestiges of desktop IE lock-in still linger elsewhere.


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reblogged via tiffanyb
~ Monday, July 7, 2014 ~
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tragedyseries:

Archive Post #24 He has a ruby-spleen somewhere in there too.

tragedyseries:

Archive Post #24 He has a ruby-spleen somewhere in there too.


784 notes
reblogged via tragedyseries
~ Thursday, June 26, 2014 ~
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Configuring an Airport Extreme for a Guest Network and Internal DNS

This is maybe an unusual scenario, but Google tells me other people have asked the same question and not gotten answers, and I just got it working.

Suppose:  you have an Airport Extreme Base Station, and you want to use both the guest network feature and an internal DNS server for users on the private network (say, because you run a service on a home server that needs to mask a related service on a public IP, or to solve a routing issue relating to services provided publicly through NAT).  This is not supported in any straightforward way, because the guest network is on another subnet with no routing to the private network:

  • If you configure the Airport Extreme to use your internal DNS, no clients of the guest network will be able to resolve hostnames;
  • If you configure the Airport Extreme with public DNS, no clients of the private network will be able to use the internal IP addresses of your server(s).

Read More

Tags: dhcp dns mac airport extreme networking nerd extreme
~ Wednesday, June 11, 2014 ~
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ilovecharts:

When Genius Slept

With all the authority of Some Guy On The Internet, this is a terrible graphic. If you’re going to do a 24 hour clock, put midnight at the bottom and set white and black for daylight and darkness (top, white: 6am to 6pm; bottom, black, 6pm to 6am).But even then it’s impossible to see at a glance how long anybody slept and difficult to compare sleep duration, because it’s hard to eyeball a curve.This would have been far better as bars running from onset to awakening on one long axis with a consistent scale, with a total spread set to include the earliest to bed and the latest to rise, with the other axis sorted, say, by total duration of sleep, or maybe by onset since bars would be easier to compare by length.Pah!

ilovecharts:

When Genius Slept

With all the authority of Some Guy On The Internet, this is a terrible graphic. If you’re going to do a 24 hour clock, put midnight at the bottom and set white and black for daylight and darkness (top, white: 6am to 6pm; bottom, black, 6pm to 6am).

But even then it’s impossible to see at a glance how long anybody slept and difficult to compare sleep duration, because it’s hard to eyeball a curve.

This would have been far better as bars running from onset to awakening on one long axis with a consistent scale, with a total spread set to include the earliest to bed and the latest to rise, with the other axis sorted, say, by total duration of sleep, or maybe by onset since bars would be easier to compare by length.

Pah!

Tags: charts bad charts data
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Breaking bread with other people is one of the most powerful bonding experiences and choosing not to join in can be isolating for team members. Free lunches may create a bit of awkwardness, but free dinner is potentially even more divisive, because it is a workday extender. Dinner with coworkers may be great for the twenty-something with nowhere to go and an In-N-Out habit, but it’s also the thing that creates a bright line between the employees with families and obligations outside of work, and those who have nowhere particular to be in the evening.

How Perks Can Divide Us, by Melissa Santos, Rafe Colburn | Model View Culture

This is just one of many very smart observations. Go read it.


1 note
~ Tuesday, June 10, 2014 ~
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Whether or not you say “hi” to your neighbors, your presence in a relatively low-income or blue-collar community will, in fact, make it easier for other college graduates to move in; to open businesses that cater to you; to induce landlords to renovate or redevelop their properties to attract other new, wealthier residents who want access to those businesses. If your city restricts housing supply (it does) and doesn’t have smart rent control policies (it almost certainly doesn’t), you’ve ultimately helped create an economically segregated neighborhood. But it’s worse than that: it doesn’t even matter where you live.

~ Thursday, June 5, 2014 ~
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I also discovered substantial differences in average star ratings between the same chains in different parts of the country. Orlando, Florida, is the biggest outlier; chain restaurants there were rated 0.5 stars higher than the same chains elsewhere in the country. (Reviews of one Baja Fresh location in Orlando, for example, contain the sort of praise that is usually lavished upon restaurants like L’Arpège.) By contrast, the stingiest chain reviews were in the 90021 ZIP code, Los Angeles, where Mexican chains were rated about 0.4 stars lower than the national average. This presumably implies, among other things, that the standards for Mexican food are much higher in Los Angeles than in Orlando.

In Search of America’s Best Burrito | FiveThirtyEight

You could make the argument that this whole exercise is frivolous, but the idea that you can come up with a regional adjustment for Yelp reviews and then apply that adjustment to reviews of local businesses is kind of brilliant.

Also I want them to apply the VORB methodology to TripAdvisor hotel reviews, because the same linkage of review quantity to reviewer expertise, and the assumption about the number of reviews it takes to regress toward a mean review and predict how a particular hotel will be reviewed in the future are sure to apply in almost exactly the same way.

Tags: burritos reviews 538 fivethirtyeight yelp tripadvisor
~ Wednesday, June 4, 2014 ~
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tragedyseries:

When the shouts of the fishmonger, bootblack and hansom cabbies ring too loudly, you need time to finish your symphony celebrating the cetaceans or simply mean to pine for halcyon days as they fade fast into the oblivion of memory… retire to your chambers and post this helpful tag around the entry mechanism; in this way, your fellow hominids will know that you’ve grown grim about the mouth and/or require solitude to improve this maddening orb.Follow these simple instructions and make your needs plain: 1. Print out on sturdy stock at a scale of 11 X 8.5 inches2. Separate the tag (seen on the right) from the inserts be means of common shears, sever the cards from each other.3. Cut out the central circle and make small incisions on the black corner frame lines by means of a razor.  4. set in whichever miniature placard best describes your private task.

Certain parties might need this for their desks.

tragedyseries:

When the shouts of the fishmonger, bootblack and hansom cabbies ring too loudly, you need time to finish your symphony celebrating the cetaceans or simply mean to pine for halcyon days as they fade fast into the oblivion of memory… retire to your chambers and post this helpful tag around the entry mechanism; in this way, your fellow hominids will know that you’ve grown grim about the mouth and/or require solitude to improve this maddening orb.

Follow these simple instructions and make your needs plain: 

1. Print out on sturdy stock at a scale of 11 X 8.5 inches
2. Separate the tag (seen on the right) from the inserts be means of common shears, sever the cards from each other.
3. Cut out the central circle and make small incisions on the black corner frame lines by means of a razor.  
4. set in whichever miniature placard best describes your private task.

Certain parties might need this for their desks.


422 notes
reblogged via tragedyseries